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A Christmas Carol The Reading Version by Charles Dickens

A
CHRISTMAS CAROL

BY

CHARLES DICKENS

AS CONDENSED BY HIMSELF, FOR HIS
READINGS.

BOSTON:
TICKNOR AND FIELDS.
1868.

 

GAD'S HILL, HIGHAM BY ROCHESTER, KENT,
Tenth October, 1867.
 
The edition bearing the imprint of MESSSRS. TICKNOR AND FIELDS is the
only correct and authorized edition of my READINGS.

 

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by
TICKNOR AND FIELDS,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

UNIVERSITY PRESS: WELCH, BIGELOW, & Co.,
CAMBRIDGE.



 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

IN FOUR STAVES.

STAVE ONE.

STAVE TWO.

STAVE THREE.

STAVE FOUR.

 


STAVE ONE.

MARLEY'S GHOST.

MARLEY was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it. And Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change for anything he chose to put his hand to.

Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Scrooge knew he was dead? Of course he did. How could it be otherwise? Scrooge and he were partners for I don't know how many years. Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator, his sole assign, his sole residuary legatee, his sole friend, his sole mourner.

Scrooge never painted out old Marley's name, however. There it yet stood, years afterwards, above the warehouse door, -- Scrooge and Marley. The firm was known as Scrooge and Marley. Sometimes people new to the business called Scrooge Scrooge, and sometimes Marley. He answered to both names. It was all the same to him.

Oh ! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, was Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old sinner! External heat and cold had little influence on him. No warmth could warm, no cold could chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty. Foul weather didn't know where to have him. The heaviest rain and snow and hail and sleet could boast of the advantage over him in only one respect, -- they often "came down" handsomely, and Scrooge never did.

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 No. 424
 Posted on 9 June, 2006
 
 
 
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